An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification

By Geoffrey Dowding | Go to book overview

Index
ALDINE italic, 43, 45, 222
Aldus Manutius, 31, 43, 220
Alexandre, Jean, 60, 87
America, see USA
Amphiareo, Vespasiano, 127, 245
Andreae, Hieronymus, 215
Anglaise, Thomas Cottrell's, 131
Antique or egyptian types, see Egyptian
Arrighi, Lodovico degli, da Vicenza, 47, 47n, 222
Austin, Richard, 91, 250
BAILDON, John, 242
Barnard, John, 243
Baskerville, John, 64, 65, 76, 89, 91, 110, 131, 227, 234
Basle italic, 53, 223
Bastarda, 7, 127n, 213
Bâtarde Coulée, 127
Bâtarde italienne, 127
Beaujon, Paul, 63, 224
Bembo, Pietro, 31
Bensley, Thomas, 261
Besley, Robert, 195, 258, 262
Bible, Gutenberg, Mazarin, or 42-line, 5, 211
Bish, T, 255
Black-letter types, see gothic
Blado, Antonio, 47, 223, 240
Blake & Stephenson, type founders, 179, 187, 262
Block-books, see Books
Bodoni, Giovanni Battista, Parma, 76, 89, 110, 129, 230, 235
Bodoni, Ultra, American Type Founders, 163
Book types, the, 3
Books, the earliest printed, produced from wooden blocks, 3; pages of earliest, printed from movable type, completed by illuminators, 5; probably more, set in italic in Italy in sixteenth century than in roman, 53; early nineteenth century English book typography had little to commend it, 97; up to beginning of nineteenth century to be a printer meant being a printer of, 109; no tide-pages in, until after 1500, 109; description of block-book known as Biblia Pauperum, 211; first book in which a Greek type was used, 218; emblem, 223
Bower, G.W, late Bower & Bacon, 183, 260, 261
Bracketing, term used in description of some serifs, 265
CALLIGRAPHIC types, 199
Cambridge University Press, 227
Cameo types, see Reversed or,
Capitals, use of roman, with first italic types, 45, and trials with sloping, 53; Trajan Column, as basis for more than one type design, 103; modern, or near-modern-face, in first half eighteenth century, 228
Caroline minuscule, 19, 217
Caslon I, William, 32, 62, 97, 131, 221
Caslon III, William, 65, 250, 260, 261
Caslon IV, William, and first sans serif type, 179; enlarged foundry inherited from his father, 260
Cassandre, A. M, 263
Celebrino, Eustachio, calligrapher, 113
Chancery or cursive hands and development of italic types, 43

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to the History of Printing Types: An Illustrated Summary of the Main Stages in the Development of Type Design from 1440 up to the Present Day: An Aid to Type Face Identification
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Contents xv
  • List of Illustrations xvii
  • Introduction xxi
  • Part One the Book Types I 3
  • Gothic 5
  • Roman Venetian 19
  • Roman Old Face 31
  • The Italics 43
  • The Intermediate1 or Transitional Romans 59
  • The Modern-Face Romans 75
  • The Modernized Italics 87
  • Old Style 97
  • Twentieth- Century Types 101
  • Part Two the Display Types 109
  • II 109
  • Latin or Renaissance Scripts 127
  • Decorated 145
  • Shaded 155
  • Fat Face 161
  • Antique or Egyptian 169
  • Shadowed or Three-Dimensional1 175
  • Sans Serif 179
  • Reversed or Cameo 183
  • Ionic 187
  • Outline or Open 191
  • Clarendon 195
  • Calligraphic 199
  • Stencil 203
  • Typewriter 205
  • Miscellaneous Display Types 207
  • Notes on the Illustrations 209
  • Appendix I 264
  • Appendix II Serifs 267
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 273
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.