Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria after the Second World War

By Reinhold Wagnleitner; Diana M. Wolf | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The research in the United States for this book was made possible by the generous support of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Fulbright Commission. The translation was generously supported by the Stiftungs- und Förderungsgesellschaft der Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg and the Austrian Ministry for Science and Research.

My research was facilitated by archivists Sally Marks and Kathy O. Nicastro of the National Archives in Washington, D.C.; Fred Pernell of the Washington National Record Center in Suitland, Md.; Martin J. Manning and Kathryn T. Shimabukuro of the U.S. Information Agency Library, Historical Collection, in Washington, D.C.; the librarians of the Library of Congress; Gertrude Weitgruber of the Department of History of the University of Salzburg; and Roswitha Haller of the Amerika Haus Library in Vienna. I also thank Melvyn Dubofsky, Gottfried "Pongo" Hutter, Heidrun Maschl, Barbara and Herbert Peretti, Emily S. Rosenberg, Nicole Slupetzky, and Siegbert Stronegger.

In particular, I extend my gratitude to Diana M. Wolf, who patiently saw the book grow from beginning to end. I am grateful not only for her critical support but especially--and this is most important for this version of my book-- for her congenial translation of the text into English as well as the compilation of the index.

Last, but not least, I thank my parents and my brother, Günter. After all, it was my family that made it possible for me to grow up in an environment in which the otherwise defamed musical influences emanating from America were always appreciated. In the Upper Austrian town Mauerkirchen, that was anything but normal in the 1950s and 1960s.

Salzburg, December 1993 Reinhold Wagnleitner

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