The Press of the Young Republic, 1783-1833

By Carol Sue Humphrey | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments

The author and the publisher gratefully acknowledge permission to reprint the following materials:

Excerpts from the William Henry Brodnax Papers, Richard Keith Call Letter, Francis Asbury Dickins Papers, Fontaine Family Papers, James Mercer Garnett Papers, Robert Selden Garnett Papers, Gooch Family Papers, Greene Family Papers, Hugh Blair Grigsby Papers, William Hammett Papers, Harrison Family Papers, Haxall Family Papers, Henry Lee Papers, Mercer Family Papers, John Stuart Skinner Papers, and Spragins Family Papers appear courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia.

Material from Carol Sue Humphrey, "This Popular Engine": New England Newspapers During the American Revolution, 1775-1789 ( Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1992) appears courtesy of the University of Delaware Press.

Materials from Carol Sue Humphrey, "'Little Ado About Something': Philadelphia Newspapers and the Constitutional Convention," American Journalism 5 ( 1988): 63-80, and Carol Sue Humphrey, "Greater Distance = Declining Interest: Massachusetts Printers and Protection for a Free Press, 1783-1791," American Journalism (forthcoming), appear courtesy of American Journalism, Athens, Georgia.

Material from Carol Sue Humphrey, "'That Bulwark of Our Liberties': Massachusetts Printers and the Issue of a Free Press, 1783-1788," Journalism History 14 (Spring 1987): 34-38, appears courtesy of Journalism History, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Excerpts from the Joel Barlow Papers, the Book Trades Collection, and the Isaiah Thomas Papers appear courtesy of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Materials from Aurora Office Account Books, the Robert and Francis Bailey Records, the Meredith Papers ( Port Folio Group), and the Woodhouse Collection appear courtesy of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Press of the Young Republic, 1783-1833
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also Available in the History of American Journalism ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - A New Era Begins: The Confederation, 1783-1789 1
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - The Adoption of the Bill of Rights, 1789-1791 27
  • Notes 36
  • 3 - The First Political Party System, 1791-1800 41
  • 4 - The Challenge of the Sedition Act, 1798-1800 57
  • Notes 68
  • 5 - The Age of Jefferson, 1800-1808 71
  • Notes 81
  • 6 - The War of 1812 1809-1815 85
  • Notes 95
  • 7 - The Era of Good Feelings, 1815-1824 99
  • 8 - The Age of Jackson, 1824-1833 113
  • Notes 129
  • 9 - Changes in Journalism, 1800-1833 133
  • Notes 150
  • 10 - Reflections on the Press of the Young Republic 155
  • Note 160
  • Bibliographical Essay 161
  • Sources 167
  • Index 177
  • About the Author 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.