The Philippines in World War II, 1941-1945: A Chronology and Select Annotated Bibliography of Books and Articles in English

By Walter F. Bell | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The Bataan Death March, Prisoners of War, and Civilian Internees

There has been a considerable amount written concerning the Bataan Death March and Japanese treatment of Allied prisoners of war and civilian internees. Much of this literature consists of memoirs by survivors (many of which have already been cited) which provide arresting and wrenching insights into the human impact of Japanese brutality. In addition there have been a number of analyses by scholars and journalists of the sources and causes of Japanese conduct. Many of these issues have been the subject of intense controversy. There has been disagreement among students of the Bataan Death March over whether that tragedy was an accident caused by Japanese unpreparedness to handle an unexpectedly large number of prisoners after the Bataan surrender or whether it happened by design. The hanging of General Homma in 1946 due to his responsibility as Commander of Japanese forces in the Philippines has been the source of considerable controversy. Likewise there is the question of the causes of poor treatment of captives by Japanese authorities. Was this due to cultural differences or Japan's hatred of the Western powers? Another field of interest for sociologists as well as psychologists are the reactions to captivity on the part of POWs and interned civilians and the factors involved in the better survival rates among some groups. The works cited below represent a cross-section of the best studies done on these sensitive and controversial issues. (See Also Biographies, Memoirs and Diaries, Liberation of Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees, and War Crimes.)

-162-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Philippines in World War II, 1941-1945: A Chronology and Select Annotated Bibliography of Books and Articles in English
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.