In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity

By Thomas G. West | Go to book overview

3 Constellations of Traits, Some Neurological Perspectives

Reflections on any conceivable subject succeed one another in his racing brain. The plight of mankind, he muses, is "all the fault of the human mind being made in two lobes, only one of which does any thinking, so we are all right-handed or left-handed; whereas, if we were properly constructed, we should use our right and left hands with equal force and skill according to circumstances. As it is, those who can win a war well can rarely make a good peace, and those who could make a good peace never win."

Winston Churchill

The Last Lion, Alone, 1932-1940


James Hinshelwood and the Language Teacher

In August of 1894 a patient came to see Dr. James Hinshelwood at the Glasgow Eye Infirmary. Hinshelwood observed that the patient was a man of education and intelligence, a teacher of French and German. In spite of his extensive language abilities, the patient had discovered, to his great alarm, that he had suddenly become entirely unable to read. As Hinshelwood reported,

About one month previously he was greatly startled to find that one morning in his own house he could not read the French exercise which a pupil gave him to correct. On the previous day he had read and corrected the exercises just as usual. Greatly puzzled, he went into an adjoining room,

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