In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity

By Thomas G. West | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Symptomatology

Symptomatology U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (1966)

Despite the fact that it is over twenty years old, the following listing of ninety-nine traits is still one of the most comprehensive available. The introductory paragraphs indicate a concern with complexity of terminology and definition that has persisted to the present time. The section has been excerpted in full, using exact quotations. However, the original numbering system for each category has been changed to one that is cumulative. Asterisks have been added to indicate those characteristics considered most pertinent to the individuals profiled in the present study--forty-two of the ninety-nine traits listed. In some cases, definitions of medical terms have been added in brackets. This listing may include some symptoms that would not now be considered appropriate for a consideration of "dyslexia," "specific language disability," or "learning disabilities." However, some factors may be related, although they might initially appear to be unrelated. As we have seen, the genetic and environmental factors that affect the very early development of the brain may also affect the development of apparently unrelated body systems. ( Clements, Brain, 1966, pp. 11-13.)


VI. Symptomatology--Identification of the Child

In a search for symptoms attributed to children with minimal brain dysfunctioning, over 100 recent publications were reviewed.

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