In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images, and the Ironies of Creativity

By Thomas G. West | Go to book overview

What the critics are saying about In the Mind's Eye:

"I recommend In the Mind's Eye to parents of dyslexics many times every week. They find in it an extraordinary emancipation when they learn that their children have, along with their disability, a super ability--the extraordinary power of imagination and three-dimensional thought that will allow them to become the leaders of the twenty-first century. After reading this book, you will treasure your child's abilities as I have--discovering that they have the greatest intelligence of all--the ability to imagine."

-- Bob Arnot, M.D., Senior Medical Correspondent, CBS News

"If you accept [ Thomas West's] arguments, then the period of the domination of Western scientific thought by printed papers and mathematical formulae may be just another transitory period, perhaps akin to that of the . . . world of medieval scholasticism before the new vision of the Renaissance and the practical empiricism of the Enlightenment."

-- LordRenwick, Chair, European Informatics Market

"[This book] represents the most significant turning point in educational thought this century."

-- The Arts Dyslexia Trust Newsletter

"West's weave of case-studies and ideas to promote his arguments is intriguing and convincing."

-- European Journal for Higher Ability

"West . . . presents a valuable insight into this 'other side of dyslexia.'"

-- Gavin Reid, editor of Dimensions of Dyslexia

"[This book] will shed new light on the term 'learning disabled.'"

-- Parent's Educational Resource Center Newsletter

". . . informative and exciting."

-- Larry Silver, M.D., author of The Misunderstood Child: A Guide for Parents of Learning Disabled Children

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