Our New National Labor Policy: The Taft-Hartley Act and the Next Steps

By Fred A. Hartley Jr. | Go to book overview

PUBLISHER'S NOTE

THERE are few problems facing the people of this country that outrank in importance the issue of management-labor relations and the development of a broad and effective national labor policy. The one great political democracy and free enterprise economy can move forward only if its people meet and solve the issues of big unionism and big business.

Most impartial observers agree that while the Wagner Act gave organized labor the chance to redress historic abuses, it failed to provide the foundation for industrial peace. The Taft- Hartley Act clearly marks the beginning of a new era in labor policy, a swing-back of the pendulum in an effort to correct more recent abuses.

Few feel that this law is the final answer to a successful national labor policy, but it is one of the most significant developments in legislation in our times and does mark a start toward a lasting policy.

No thinking citizen--public, employer, employee--can plan his affairs or follow national developments without an under

-v-

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Our New National Labor Policy: The Taft-Hartley Act and the Next Steps
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Modern Industry Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher''s Note v
  • Title Page vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I- a New Congress--A New Direction 1
  • II- The Need for Change 7
  • III- The Men behind the New Law 22
  • IV- Where Labor Leadership Failed 37
  • V- The Hartley Bill Passes the House 49
  • VI- Hurdles in the Senate 62
  • VII- Compromise in Conference 75
  • VIII- Politics by Veto 89
  • IX- The Worker and the Taft-Hartley Act 103
  • X- The Employer and the Taft-Hartley Act 116
  • XI- The Public and the Taft-Hartley Act 128
  • ■xii the New Nlrb 139
  • ■xiii What We Left out 149
  • XIV- Significant Developments in the Law 160
  • XV- A National Labor Policy-- Short Term 171
  • XVI- The Long-Term Goal 184
  • Text of Labor Management Act, 1947 195
  • Index 236
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