Our New National Labor Policy: The Taft-Hartley Act and the Next Steps

By Fred A. Hartley Jr. | Go to book overview

X THE EMPLOYER AND THE TAFT-HARTLEY ACT

THIS is written for the employers of the United States of America.

Yours is a great heritage.

Your responsibilities are equally great.

The enlightened employer of 1948 appreciates his responsibilities far more than did his forebears. He knows the good old days are gone forever. Gone are the times when a man's business was his own, and the accepted philosophy that of the devil take the hindmost; gone too are the times when labor comprised the "troublesome" people who worked twelve hours for six days a week and received a minor share of your profits.

Back in the early days of the New Deal labor entered politics in full force. It joined forces with the politicians who promised the sky for the many, and it helped return those same politicians to power time and time again.

But the congressional elections of 1946 brought a day of reckoning, and the demagogs were cast aside for awhile.

-116-

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Our New National Labor Policy: The Taft-Hartley Act and the Next Steps
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Modern Industry Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher''s Note v
  • Title Page vii
  • Foreword ix
  • I- a New Congress--A New Direction 1
  • II- The Need for Change 7
  • III- The Men behind the New Law 22
  • IV- Where Labor Leadership Failed 37
  • V- The Hartley Bill Passes the House 49
  • VI- Hurdles in the Senate 62
  • VII- Compromise in Conference 75
  • VIII- Politics by Veto 89
  • IX- The Worker and the Taft-Hartley Act 103
  • X- The Employer and the Taft-Hartley Act 116
  • XI- The Public and the Taft-Hartley Act 128
  • ■xii the New Nlrb 139
  • ■xiii What We Left out 149
  • XIV- Significant Developments in the Law 160
  • XV- A National Labor Policy-- Short Term 171
  • XVI- The Long-Term Goal 184
  • Text of Labor Management Act, 1947 195
  • Index 236
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