Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'I do not deny it,' replied Don Quixote; 'but lay yourself down where you will, for it better becomes those of my profession to watch than to sleep. However, it would not be amiss, Sancho, if you would dress this ear again; for it pains me more than it should.'

Sancho did what he was commanded; and one of the goatherds, seeing the hurt, bid him not be uneasy; for he would apply such a remedy as should quickly heal it. And taking some rosemary leaves, of which there was plenty thereabouts, he chewed them, and mixed them with a little salt, and laying them to the ear, bound them on very fast, assuring him he would want no other salve, as it proved in effect.


CHAPTER 12
What a certain goatherd related to those who were with Don Quixote.

WHILE this passed, there came another of those young lads, who brought them their provisions from the village, and said:

'Comrades, do you know what passes in the village?*'

'How should we know?' answered one of them.

'Know then,' continued the youth, 'that this morning died that famous shepherd and scholar, Chrysostom; and it is whispered that he died for love of that devilish untoward lass Marcela, daughter of William the Rich; she, who rambles about these woods and fields in the dress of a shepherdess.'

'For Marcela! say you?' quoth one.

'For her, I say,' answered the goatherd: 'and the best of it is, he has ordered in his will that they should bury him in the fields as if he had been a Moor,* and that it should be at the foot of the rock by the cork-tree fountain; for, according to report and what they say he himself declared, that was the very place he himself saw her. He ordered also other things so extravagant that the clergy say they must not be performed; nor is it fit they should, for they seem to be heathenish. To all which that great friend of his, Ambrosio the student, who accompanied him likewise in the dress of a shepherd, answers, that the whole must be fulfilled without omitting anything, as Chrysostom enjoined; and upon this the village is all in an uproar: but, by what I can learn, they will at last do what Ambrosio and all the shepherd's friends require; and to-morrow they come to inter

-82-

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