Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'It is so in truth,' said Sancho, 'since the noise of the hammers of a fulling-mill were sufficient to disturb and discompose the heart of so valorous a knight as your worship. But you may depend upon it, that from henceforward I shall not open my lips to make merry with your worship's matters, but shall honour you as my master and natural lord.'

'By so doing,' replied Don Quixote, 'your days shall be long in the land; for, next to our parents, we are bound to respect our masters as if they were our fathers.'


CHAPTER 21
Which treats of the high adventure and rich prize of Mambrino's helmet with other things which befell our invincible knight.

ABOUT this time it began to rain a little, and Sancho had a mind they should betake themselves to the fulling-mills. But Don Quixote had conceived such an abhorrence of them for the late jest, that he would by no means go in: and so, turning to the right-hand, they struck into another road like that they had lighted upon the day before. Soon after, Don Quixote discovered a man on horseback, who had on his head something which glittered, as if it had been of gold; and scarcely had he seen it, but, turning to Sancho, he said:

'I am of opinion, Sancho, there is no proverb but what is true, because they are all sentences drawn from experience itself, the mother of all the sciences; especially that which says; "Where one door is shut another is opened". I say this, because, if fortune last night shut the door against what we looked for, deceiving us with the fulling-mills, it now sets another wide open for a better and more certain adventure, which if I fail to enter right into, the fault will be mine, without imputing it to my little knowledge of fulling-mills, or to the darkness of the night. This I say, because, if I mistake not, there comes one towards us, who carries on his head Mambrino's helmet,* about which I swore the oath you know.'

'Take care, Sir, what you say, and more what you do,' said Sancho; 'for I would not wish for other fulling-mills to finish the milling and mashing our senses.'

'The devil take you!'replied Don Quixote: 'what has a helmet to do with fulling-mills?'

-153-

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