Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'True,' said Don Quixote; 'but I know that he is not to blame for what has happened.'

Herewith he pacified them; and Don Quixote inquired again of the goatherd, whether it were possible to find out Cardenio; for he had a mighty desire to learn the end of his story. The goatherd told him, as at first, that he did not certainly know his haunts; but that, if he walked thereabouts pretty much, he would not fail to meet him, either in or out of his senses.


CHAPTER 25
Which treats of the strange things that befell the valiant knight of La Mancha in the Sierra Morena; and how he imitated the penance of Beltenebros.

DON QUIXOTE took his leave of the goatherd, and mounting again on Rosinante, commanded Sancho to follow him; which he did, with a very ill will. They jogged on softly, entering into the most craggy part of the mountain; and Sancho was ready to burst, for want of some talk with his master, but would fain have had him begin the discourse, that he might not break through what he had enjoined him; but, not being able to endure so long a silence, he said to him:

'Señor Don Quixote, be pleased to give me your worship's blessing, and my dismission; for I will get me home to my wife and children, with whom I shall, at least, have the privilege of talking, and speaking my mind; for, to desire me to bear your worship company through these solitudes, night and day, without suffering me to talk when I list, is to bury me alive. If fate had ordered it, that beasts should talk now, as they did in the days of Guisopete,* it had not been quite so bad; since I might then have communed with my ass as I pleased, and thus have forgotten my ill fortune; for it is very hard, and not to be borne with patience, for a man to ramble about all his life in quest of adventures, and to meet with nothing but kicks and cuffs, tossings in a blanket, and brickbat bangs, and, with all this, to sew up his mouth, and not dare to utter what he has in his heart, as if he were dumb.'

'I understand you, Sancho,' answered Don Quixote; 'you are impatient until I take off the embargo I have laid on your tongue: suppose it taken off, and say what you will, upon condition that this

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