Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

Then stripping off his breeches in all haste he remained naked from the waist downwards, and covered only with the tail of his shirt: and presently, without more ado, he cut a couple of capers in the air, and a brace of tumbles, head down and heels up, exposing things that made Sancho turn Rosinante about, that he might not see them a second time; and fully satisfied him that he might safely swear his master was stark mad; and so we will leave him going on his way until his return, which was speedy.


CHAPTER 26
A continuation of the refinements practised by Don Quixote, as a lover, in the Sierra Morena.

THE history, turning to recount what the Knight of the Sorrowful Figure did, when he found himself alone, informs us, that Don Quixote, having finished his tumbles and gambols, naked from the middle downward, and clothed from the middle upward, and perceiving that Sancho was going without caring to see any more of his foolish pranks, got upon the top of a high rock, and there began to think again of what he had often thought before, without ever coming to any resolution: and that was, which of the two was best, and would stand him in most stead, to imitate Orlando in his extravagant madness, or Amadis in his melancholic moods. And, talking to himself, he said:

'If Orlando was so good and valiant a knight, as everybody allows he was, what wonder is it since, in short, he was enchanted, and nobody could kill him, but by thrusting a needle into the sole of his foot; and therefore he always wore shoes with seven soles of iron? These contrivances, however, stood him in no stead against Bernando del Carpio, who knew the secret, and pressed him to death, between his arms, in Roncesvalles. But setting aside his valour, let us come to his losing his wits, which it is certain he did, occasioned by some tokens he found in the forest, and by the news brought him by the shepherd, that Angelica had slept more than two afternoons with Medoro, a little Moor with curled locks, and page to Agramante. And if he knew this to he true, and that his lady played him false, he did no great matter in running mad. But how can I imitate him in his

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