Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

quite overturned Lothario's integrity. And without regarding anything but what tended to the gratification of his passion, at the end of three days from the time of Anselmo's absence, during which he had been in perpetual struggle with his desires, he began to solicit Camilla with such earnestness and disorder, and with such amorous expressions, that Camilla was astonished, and could only rise from her seat, and retire to her chamber, without answering a word. But, notwithstanding this sudden blast, Lothario's hope was not withered: for hope, being born with love, always lives with it. On the contrary, he was the more eager in the pursuit of Camilla: who, having discovered in Lothario what she could never have imagined, was at a loss how to behave. But thinking it neither safe nor right to give him opportunity or leisure of talking to her any more, she resolved, as she accordingly did, to send that very night one of her servants to Anselmo with a letter, wherein she wrote as follows.


CHAPTER 34
In which is continued 'The Novel of the Curious Impertinent'.

CAMILLA'S LETTER TO ANSELMO.

'AN army, it is commonly said, makes but an ill appearance without its general, and a castle without its governor; but a young married woman, I say, makes a worse without a husband, when there is no just cause for his absence. I am so uneasy without you, and so entirely unable to support this absence, that, if you do not return speedily, I must go and pass my time at my father's house, though I leave yours without a guard: for the guard you left me, if you left him with that title, is, I believe, more intent upon his own pleasure than upon anything which concerns you: and, since you are wise, I shall say no more, nor is it proper I should.'

Anselmo received this letter, and understood by it that Lothario had begun the attack, and that Camilla must have received it according to his wish: and overjoyed at this good news, he sent Camilla a verbal message, not to stir from her house upon any account, for he would return very speedily. Camilla was surprised at Anselmo's

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