Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

desiring she should: and, since I was the contriver of my own dishonour, there is no reason why --"

'Thus far Anselmo wrote; by which it appeared, that, at this point, without being able to finish the sentence, he gave up the ghost.

'The next day his friend sent his relations an account of his death; who had already heard of his misfortune, and of Camilla's retiring to the convent, where she was almost in a condition of bearing her husband company in that inevitable journey; not through the news of his death, but of her lover absenting himself. It is said, that, though she was now a widow, she would neither quit the convent, nor take the veil, until, not many days after, news being come of Lothario's being killed in a battle, fought about that time between Monsieur de Lautrec, and the Great Captain Goncalo Hernandez of Córdova, in the kingdom of Naples,* whither the too-late repenting friend had made his retreat, she then took the religious habit, and soon after gave up her life into the rigorous hands of grief and melancholy. This was the end of them all, an end sprung from an extravagant rashness at the beginning.'

'I like this novel very well,' said the priest; 'but I cannot persuade myself it is a true story: and if it be a fiction, the author has erred against probability: for it cannot be imagined, there can be any husband so senseless, as to desire to make so dangerous an experiment, as Anselmo did: had this case been supposed between a gallant and his mistress, it might pass; but, between husband and wife, there is something impossible in it: however, I am not displeased with the manner of telling it.'


CHAPTER 36
Which treats of other uncommon accidents, that happened at the inn.

WHILE these things passed, the host, who stood at the inn-door, said:

'Here comes a goodly company of guests: if they stop here, we will sing Gaudeamus.'

'What folks are they?' said Cardenio.

'Four men,' answered the host, 'on horseback á la gineta,* with lances and targets, and black masks on their faces; and with them a

-321-

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