Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'This, gentlemen, is my history: whether it be an entertaining and uncommon one, you are to judge. For my own part I can say, I would willingly have related it still more succinctly, though the fear of tiring you has made me omit several circumstances, which were at my tongue's end.'


CHAPTER 42
Which treats of what further happened in the inn, and of many other things worthy to be known.

HERE the captive ended his story; to whom Don Fernando said:

'Truly, captain, the manner of your relating this strange adventure has been such, as equals the surprising novelty of the event itself. The whole is extraordinary, uncommon, and full of accidents, which astonish and surprise those who hear them. And so great is the pleasure we have received in listening to it, that though the story should have held until to-morrow, we should have wished it were to begin again.'

And, upon saying this, Cardenio and the rest of the company offered him all the service in their power, with such expressions of kindness and sincerity, that the captain was extremely well satisfied of their goodwill. Don Fernando in particular offered him, that, if he would return with him, he would prevail with the marquess his brother, to stand godfather at Zoraida's baptism, and that, for his own part, he would accommodate him in such a manner, that he might appear in his own country with the dignity and distinction due to his person. The captive thanked him most courteously, but would not accept of any of his generous offers.

By this time night was come on; and, about dusk, a coach arrived at the inn, with some men on horseback. They asked for a lodging. The hostess answered, there was not an inch of room in the whole inn, but what was taken up.

'Though it be so,' said one of the men on horseback, 'there must be room made for my lord judge here in the coach.'

At this name the hostess was troubled, and said:

'Sir, the truth is, I have no bed; but if his worship my lord judge brings one with him, as I believe he must, let him enter in God's

-380-

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