Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

arms; and they two, being locked up together in the knight's chamber, held another dialogue, not a jot inferior to the former.


CHAPTER 7
Of what passed between Don Quixote and his squire, with other most famous occurrences.

THE housekeeper no sooner saw that Sancho and her master had locked themselves up together, but she presently began to suspect the drift of their conference; and imagining that it would end in a resolution for a third sally, she took her veil, and, full of anxiety and trouble, went in quest of the bachelor Sampson Carrasco, thinking that, as he was a well-spoken person, and a new acquaintance of her master's, he might be able to dissuade him from so extravagant a purpose. She found him walking to and fro in the courtyard of his house, and, as soon as she espied him, she fell down at his feet in violent disorder and a cold sweat. When Carrasco beheld her with signs of so much sorrow and heart-beating, he said:

'What is the matter, Mistress Housekeeper? what has befallen you, that you look as if your heart was at your mouth?'

'Nothing at all, dear Master Sampson,' quoth she; 'only that my master is most certainly breaking forth.'

'How breaking forth, madam?' demanded Sampson; 'has he broken a hole in any part of his body?'

'No,' quoth she, 'he is only breaking forth at the door of his own madness: I mean, Señor Bachelor of my soul, that he has a mind to sally out again (and this will be his third time), to ramble about the world in quest of what he calls adventures,* though for my part, I cannot tell why he calls them so. The first time he was brought home to us athwart an ass, and mashed to a mummy. The second time he came home in an ox-wagon, locked up in a cage, in which he persuaded himself he was enchanted: and the poor soul was so changed, that he could not be known by the mother that bore him, feeble, wan, his eyes sunk to the inmost lodgings of his brain, insomuch that I spent above six hundred eggs in getting him a little up again, as God and the world is my witness, and my hens that will not let me lie.'

'I can easily believe that,' answered the bachelor; 'for they are so

-507-

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