Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

bachelor, were not to be numbered; they tore their hair, and scratched their faces, and, like the funeral mourners formerly in fashion, lamented the approaching departure, as if it were the death of their master. The design Sampson had in persuading him to sally forth again, was to do what the history tells us hereafter, all by the advice of the priest and the barber, with whom he had plotted beforehand.

In short, in those three days, Don Quixote and Sancho furnished themselves with what they thought convenient, and, Sancho having appeased his wife, and Don Quixote his niece and housekeeper, in the dusk of the evening, unobserved by anybody but the bachelor, who would needs bear him company half a league from the village, they took the road to Toboso; Don Quixote upon his good Rosinante, and Sancho upon his old Dapple, his wallets stored with provisions, and his purse with money, which Don Quixote had given him against whatever might happen. Sampson embraced him, praying him to give him advice of his good or ill fortune, that he might rejoice or condole with him, as the laws of their mutual friendship required. Don Quixote promised he would: Sampson returned to the village, and the knight and squire took their way towards the great city of Toboso.


CHAPTER 8
Wherein is related what befell Don Quixote, as he was going to visit his lady Dulcinea del Toboso.

'PRAISED be the mighty Allah!' says Cid Hamet Ben Engeli, at the beginning of this eighth chapter: 'praised be Allah!' repeating it thrice, and saying, he gives these praises, to find that Don Quixote and Sancho had again taken the field, and that the readers of their delightful history may make account, that, from this moment the exploits and witty sayings of Don Quixote and his squire begin. He persuades them to forget the former chivalries of the ingenious gentleman, and fix their eyes upon his future achievements, which begin now upon the road to Toboso as the former began in the fields of Montiel; and this is no very unreasonable request, considering what great things he promises, and thus he goes on, saying:

-513-

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