Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

Sancho, 'and meddle not with judging of other men's fears or valours; for perhaps I am as pretty a fearer of God as any of my neighbours: and pray let me whip off this scum; for all besides is idle talk, of which we must give an account in the next world.'

And, so saying, he fell to afresh, and assaulted his kettle with so long-winded an appetite, that he awakened that of Don Quixote, who doubtless would have assisted him, had he not been prevented by what we are under a necessity of immediately telling.


CHAPTER 21
In which is continued the history of Camacho's wedding, with other delightful accidents.

WHILE Don Quixote and Sancho were engaged in the discourses mentioned in the preceding chapter, they heard a great outcry and noise, raised and occasioned by those that rode on the mares, who, in full career, and with a great shout, went to meet the bride and bridegroom, who were coming, surrounded with a thousand kinds of musical instruments and inventions, accompanied by the parish priest and the kindred on both sides, and by all the better sort of people from the neighbouring towns, all in their holiday apparel. And when Sancho espied the bride, he said:

'In good faith, she is not clad like a country girl, but like any court lady: by the mass, the breast-piece she wears seems to me at this distance to be of rich coral; and her gown, instead of green stuff of Cuenca, is no less than a thirty-piled velvet: besides the trimming, I vow, is of satin. Then do but observe her hands: instead of rings of jet, let me never thrive, but they are of gold, aye, and of right gold, and adorned with pearls as white as a curd, and every one of them worth an eye of one's head. Ah, whoreson jade! and what fine hair she has! if it is not false, I never saw longer nor fairer in all my life. Then her sprightliness and mien: why, she is a very moving palmtree, laden with branches of dates; for just so look the trinkets hanging at her hair, and about her neck: by my soul the girl is so well plated over, she might pass current at any bank in Flanders.'*

Don Quixote smiled at the rustic praises bestowed by Sancho Panza, and thought that, setting aside his mistress Dulcinea del

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