Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

account of what had passed between them, and they two agreed to contrive and give orders to have a jest put upon Don Quixote, which should be famous, and consonant to the style of knight-errantry; in which they played him many, so proper, and such ingenious ones, that they are some of the best adventures contained in this grand history.


CHAPTER 34 .
Giving an account of the method prescribed for disenchanting the peerless Dulcinea del Toboso; which is one of the most famous adventures of this book

GREAT was the pleasure the duke and duchess received from the conversation of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza; and, persisting in the design they had of playing them some tricks, which should carry the semblance and face of adventures, they took a hint from what Don Quixote had already told them of Montesinos' cave, to dress up a famous one. But what the duchess most wondered at was, that Sancho should be so very simple, as to believe for certain, that Dulcine del Toboso was enchanted, he himself having been the enchanter and impostor in that business. And so, having instructed their servants how they were to behave, six days after, they carried Don Quixote a-hunting with a train of hunters and huntsmen, not inferior to that of a crowned head. They gave Don Quixote a hunting suit, and Sancho another, of the finest green cloth: but Don Quixote would not put his on, saying, he must shortly return to the severe exercise of arms, and that he could not carry wardrobes and sumptress about him. But Sancho took what was given him, with design to sell it the first opportunity he should have.

The expected day being come, Don Quixote armed himself, and Santo put on his new suit, and mounted Dapple, whom he would not quit, though they offered him a horse; and so he thrust himself amidst the troop of hunters. The duchess issued forth magnificently dressed, and Don Quixote, out of pure politeness and civility, held the reins of her palfrey, though the duke would not consent to it. At last they came to a wood, between two very high mountains, where posting themselves, in places where the toils were to be pitched, and

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