Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

there should be one, it will be at the expense both of your reputation and fortune.

'If a beautiful woman comes to demand justice, turn away your eyes from her tears, and your ears from her sighs, and consider at leisure the substance of her request, unless you have a mind your reason should be drowned in her tears, and your integrity in her sighs.

'Him you are to punish with deeds, do not evil entreat with words; for the pain of the punishment is enough for the wretch to bear, without the addition of ill language.

'In the criminal, who falls under your jurisdiction, consider the miserable man, subject to the condition of our depraved nature; and, as much as in you lies, without injuring the contrary party, show pity and clemency; for, though the attributes of God are all equal, that of His mercy is more pleasing and attractive in our eyes, than that of His justice.

'If, Sancho, you observe these precepts and these rules, your days will be long, and your fame eternal, your recompense full, and your felicity unspeakable. You shall match your children as you please; they and your grandchildren shall inherit titles; you shall live in peace, and in favour with all men; and, at the end of your life, death shall find you in a sweet and mature old age, and your eyes shall be closed by the tender and pious hands of your grandchildren's children.

'What I have hitherto taught you, Sancho, are documents for the adorning of your mind: listen now to those which concern the adornments of the body.'


CHAPTER 43
Of the second instructions Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza.

WHO that had heard the foregoing discourse of Don Quixote's, but would have taken him for a prudent and intelligent person? But, as it has been often said in the progress of this grand history, he talked foolishly only when chivalry was the subject, and in the rest of his conversation showed himself master of a clear and agreeable understanding; insomuch that his actions perpetually bewrayed his

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