Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

'Let no one take him off; leave me to battle with this demon, this wizard, this enchanter; for I will make him know the difference betwixt him and me, and who Don Quixote de la Mancha is.'

But the cat, not regarding these menaces, growled on, and kept its hold. At length the duke forced open its claws, and threw it out at the window.

Don Quixote remained with his face like a sieve, and his nose not over whole, though greatly dissatisfied that they would not let him finish the combat he had so toughly maintained against that caitiff enchanter. They fetched some oil of Aparicio,* and Altisidora herself; with her lily-white hands, bound up his wounds; and, while she was so employed, she said to him in a low voice:

'All these misadventures befall you, hard-hearted knight, for the sin of your stubborn disdain: and God grant that Sancho your squire may forget to whip himself, that this same beloved Dulcinea of yours may never be released from her enchantment, nor you ever enjoy her,* or approach her nuptial bed, at least while I live, who adore you.'

To all this Don Quixote returned no other answer than a profound sigh, and then stretched himself at full length upon his bed, humbly thanking the duke and duchess for their assistance, not as being afraid of that cattish, bellringing, necromantic crew, but as he was sensible of their good intention by their readiness to succour him. The duke and duchess left him to his rest, and went away, not a little concerned at the ill success of their joke; for they did not think this adventure would have proved so heavy and so hard upon Don Quixote; for it cost him five days' confinement to his bed; where another adventure befell him more relishing than the former, which his historian will not relate at present, that he may attend Sancho Panza, who went on very busily and very pleasantly with his government.


CHAPTER 47
Giving a further account of Sancho's behaviour in his government.

THE history relates, that they conducted Sancho Panza from the court of judicature to a sumptuous palace, where, in a great hall, was spread an elegant and splendid table: and soon as Sancho entered the

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