Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

crack your skull: son of a whore, rascal, painter for the devil himself! at this time of day to come and ask me for six hundred ducats! Where should I have them, stinkard? and, if I had them, why should I give them to thee, jibing fool? What care I for Miguel Turra, or for the whole race of the Perlerines? Begone, I say, or, by the life of my lord duke, I will be as good as my word. You are no native of Miguel Turra, but some scoffer sent from hell to tempt me. Impudent scoundrel! I have not yet had the government a day and a half and you would have me have six hundred ducats?'

The sewer made signs to the countryman to go out of the hall, which he did, hanging down his head, and seemingly afraid, lest the governor should execute his threat; for the knave very well knew how to play his part.

But let us leave Sancho in his passion, and peace be with him and company; and let us turn to Don Quixote, whom we left with his face bound up, and under cure of his cattish wounds, of which he was not quite healed in eight days, in one of which there befell him what Cid Hamet promises to relate, with that punctuality and truth with which he relates everything belonging to the history, be it never so minute.


CHAPTER 48
Of what befell Don Quixote with Doña Rodriguez the duchess's duenna; together with other accidents worthy to be written, and had in eternal remembrance.

ABOVE measure discontented and melancholy was the sorewounded Don Quixote, having his face bound up, and marked, not by the hand of God, but by the claws of a cat; misfortunes incident to knight-errantry. During six days he appeared not in public; on one night of which, lying awake and restless, meditating on his misfortunes, and the persecution he suffered from Altisidora, he perceived somebody was opening his chamber door with a key, and presently imagined that the enamoured damsel was coming to assault his chastity, and expose him to the temptation of failing in the fidelity he owed to his lady Dulcinea del Toboso.

'No,' said he (believing what he fancied, and so loud as to be

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