Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

shape to another. A knight whom he vanquished a few days ago, called the Knight of the Looking-Glasses, was changed by them into the shape and figure of the bachelor Sampson Carrasco, a native of our town, and a great friend of ours; and they have turned my lady Dulcinea del Toboso into a downright country wench: therefore I imagine this lackey will live and die a lackey all the days of his life.'

To which Rodriguez's daughter said:

'Let him be who he will that demands me to wife, I take it kindly of him; for I had rather be lawful wife to a lackey, than a cast mistress, and tricked by a gentleman, though he, who abused me, is not one.'

In short, all these accidents and events ended in Tosilos's confinement, till it should appear what his transformation would come to. The victory was adjudged to Don Quixote by a general acclamation: but the greater part of the spectators were out of humour to find, that the so much expected combatants had not hacked one another to pieces; just as boys are sorry, when the criminal they expected to see hanged, is pardoned, either by the prosecutor, or the court.

The crowd dispersed: the duke and Don Quixote returned to the castle: Tosilos was confined: and Doña Rodriguez and her daughter were extremely well pleased to see, that, one way or other, this business was like to end in matrimony, and Tosilos hoped no less.


CHAPTER 57
Which relates how Don Quixote took his leave of the duke, and of what befell him with the witty and wanton Altisidora, one of the duchess's waiting-women.

Don Quixote now thought it high time to quit so idle a life as that he had led in the castle, thinking he committed a great fault in suffering his person to be thus confined, and in living lazily amidst the infinite pleasures and entertainments the duke and duchess provided for him as a knight-errant; and he was of opinion he must give a strict account to God for this inactivity. And therefore he one day asked leave of [their graces], that he might depart, which they granted him, with tokens of being mightily troubled that he would leave them. The duchess gave Sancho Panza his wife's letters, which he wept over, and said:

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