Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

and not those described by the Aragonese author. Don Quixote got up very early, and, tapping at the partition of the other room, he again bade his new friends adieu: Sancho paid the innkeeper most magnificently, and advised him to brag less of the provision of his inn, or to provide it better.


CHAPTER 60
Of what befell Don Quixote in his way to Barcelona.

THE morning was cool, and the day promised to be so too, when Don Quixote left the inn, first informing himself which was the directest road to Barcelona, without touching at Saragossa; so great was his desire to give the lie to that new historian, who, it was said, had abused him so much.

Now it happened, that, in above six days, nothing fell out worth setting down in writing: at the end of which, going out of the road, night overtook them among some shady oaks or cork-trees; for, in this, Cid Hamet does not observe that punctuality he is wont to do in other matters. Master and man alighted from their beasts, and, seating themselves at the foot of the trees, Sancho, who had had his afternoon's collation that day, entered abruptly the gates of sleep. But Don Quixote, whose imaginations, much more than hunger, kept him waking, could not close his eyes: on the contrary, he was hurried in thought to and from a thousand places: now he fancied himself in Montesinos' cave; now, that he saw Dulcinea, transformed into a country wench, mount upon her ass at a spring; the next moment, that he was hearing the words of the sage Merlin, declaring to him the conditions to be observed, and the dispatch necessary for the disenchantment of Dulcinea. He was ready to run mad, to see the carelessness and little charity of his squire Sancho, who, as he believed, had given himself five lashes only; a number poor and disproportionate to the infinite still behind: and hence he conceived so much chagrin and indignation, that he spoke thus to himself:

'If Alexander the Great cut the Gordian knot, saying, to cut is the same as to untie, and became nevertheless, universal lord of all Asia, the same, neither more nor less, may happen now, in the disenchantment of Dulcinea, if I should whip Sancho whether he will

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