Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; Charles Jarvis et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 64
Treating of the adventure which gave Don Quixote more sorrow than any which had hitherto befallen him.

THE history relates, that the wife of Don Antonio Moreno took a great deal of pleasure in seeing Anna Felix in her house. She gave her a kind welcome, enamoured as well of her beauty as of her discretion; for the Morisca excelled in both; and all the people of the city flocked to see her, as if they had been brought together by ringing the great bell. Don Quixote said to Don Antonio, that the method they had resolved upon for the redemption of Don Gregorio was quite a wrong one, there being more danger than probability of success in it; and that they would do better to land him, with his horse and arms, in Barbary; for he would fetch him off in spite of the whole Moorish race as Don Gayferos had done by his spouse Melisendra.

'Take notice, sir,' quoth Sancho, hearing this, 'that Señor Don Gayferos rescued his spouse on firm land, and carried her over land into France; but here, if, peradventure, we rescue Don Gregorio, we have no way to bring him into Spain, since the sea is between.'

'For all things there is a remedy, excepting for death,' replied Don Quixote; 'for, let but a vessel come to the seaside, and we can embark in it, though the whole world should endeavour to oppose it.'

'Your worship,' quoth Sancho, 'contrives and makes the matter very easy; but, between the saying and the fact is a very large tract; and I stick to the renegado, who seems to me a very honest and good- natured man.'

Don Antonio said, 'if the renegado should miscarry in the business, it would be time enough to put in practice the expedient of the great Don Quixote's passing over into Barbary.'

Two days after, the renegado set sail in a small bark of six oars on a side, manned with a stout crew, and two days after that, the galleys departed for the Levant, the general having engaged the viceroy to give him advice of all that should happen in respect to the deliverance of Don Gregorio, and the fortune of Anna Felix.

One morning, Don Quixote being sallied forth to take the air on the strand, armed at all points (for, as he was wont to say, his arms were his finery, and his recreation fighting, and so he was seldom without them), he perceived advancing towards him a knight, armed

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