Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528

By Steven A. Epstein | Go to book overview

3
Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, 1204-1257

In the first half of the thirteenth century Genoa faced many devils, at least in local opinion, and the sea remained a refuge and an opportunity to grow rich. But it also became a means to attack Genoa, and warfare arrived just outside the harbor. The principal devil, especially in the eyes of Genoa's own Pope Innocent IV, was the emperor Frederick II, supported by a cast of lesser demons, the Ghibellines, among whom the Pisans were most prominent. There was, however, an imperial party within the city itself, so the usual civic strife grew even sharper as it reflected wider struggles in the Mediterranean. But inside Genoa other devils, the people, seemed increasingly threatening to their self-proclaimed betters. Beyond all these difficulties, more traditionally perceived enemies of the faith, whether Muslims in the east or heretics in Lombardy, menaced the spiritual and economic well-being of the city. Between the devil and the deep blue sea, between real trouble and large

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Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Figures & Maps xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528 1
  • 1 - From Practically Nothing to Something, 958-1154 9
  • 2 - The Takeoff, 1154-1204 54
  • 3 - Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, 1204-1257 96
  • 4 - Captains of the People, 1257-1311 140
  • 5 - Long Live the People, the Merchants, & the Doge, 1311-1370 188
  • 6 - Liberty and Humanism: Slavery and the Bank, 1370-1435 228
  • 7 - To Throw Away a Thousand Worlds, 1436-1528 271
  • Epilogue 319
  • Appendix - Genoese Revolts and Changes in Government, 1257-1528 325
  • Notes 329
  • Bibliography 369
  • Index 383
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