War Propaganda and the United States

By Harold Lavine; James Wechsler | Go to book overview
The Russian invasion, as seen from Union Square302
Upper-class America danced, sang, and drank -- for Finland302
Meanwhile, the Communists wrote books -- for Russia303

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Members of the Institute for Propaganda Analysis will note that some of the factual material in this book is derived from previous publications of the Institute. All students of propaganda will recognize our reliance upon the major works dealing with the subject; but particularly upon Walter Millis' Road to War, Harold D. Lasswell's Propaganda Technique in the World War, H. C. Peterson's Propaganda for War, and, in a somewhat different sense, Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf.

The authors were immeasurably helped by the advice and patience of Eugene Davidson of the Yale University Press; the coöperation of Clyde R. Miller, executive secretary of the Institute for Propaganda Analysis; the research and technical assistance of Anne Simmons, Doris Wolson, Janie McDowell, and Eunice Carmichael; and the constant encouragement of Violet Edwards Lavine and Nancy Fraenkel Wechsler.

H. L. and J. W.

New York City, May 16, 1940

-vi-

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War Propaganda and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Introduction vii
  • War Propaganda and the United States 1
  • Chapter II - The Greatest Neutral 39
  • Chapter III - "The British Are Coming!" 113
  • Chapter IV - Inside the Word Factories 153
  • Chapter V - England Expects 171
  • Chapter VI - Expeditionary Force 217
  • Chapter VII - Germany Hopes 240
  • Chapter VIII - Modern Improvements 265
  • Chapter IX - Finland Vs. Russia 282
  • Chapter X - Midstream 325
  • Index 357
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