War Propaganda and the United States

By Harold Lavine; James Wechsler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
GERMANY HOPES

I

ISOLATIONISTS thundered at the pro-Ally case as expounded by Harold Nicolson, Alfred Duff Cooper, the Marquess of Lothian, Lord Dudley Leigh Marley. Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's promise to "destroy Hitlerism" sent the staff of the Daily Worker scurrying to hammer out white-hot editorials, charging that it was Chamberlain himself who handed the Sudetenland to Hitler, who looked on benignly while the armies of the Reich goose-stepped into Prague, who connived in the destruction of democracy in Spain. As Viscount Halifax talked of "European federation," C. Hartley Grattan wondered out loud in the pages of Harper's Magazine.1 Others, less willing than Grattan to accept Lord Halifax at his somewhat ephemeral word, countered that Le Temps, of Paris, was talking, not about "European federation," but about dismembering the Reich. Still others asked: Is Chamberlain planning to restore the Hohenzollerns and Habsburgs, as Duff Cooper has intimated? And, if that is Chamberlain's intention, what sort of "European federation" can we expect? Questions, angry questions, pelted the visiting lecturers from London and Paris wherever they went: Isn't the solicitude of the Allies for the integrity of small nations really solicitude for the age-old balance of power? Why doesn't England give India her freedom? Argumentative book reviews clattered from isolationist typewriters. In the columns of the magazines, isolationist publicists mobilized their syllogisms to repel the interventionist word wave.

Meanwhile, in the New York Herald Tribune, Dor

____________________
1
February, 1940.

-240-

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War Propaganda and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Illustrations v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Introduction vii
  • War Propaganda and the United States 1
  • Chapter II - The Greatest Neutral 39
  • Chapter III - "The British Are Coming!" 113
  • Chapter IV - Inside the Word Factories 153
  • Chapter V - England Expects 171
  • Chapter VI - Expeditionary Force 217
  • Chapter VII - Germany Hopes 240
  • Chapter VIII - Modern Improvements 265
  • Chapter IX - Finland Vs. Russia 282
  • Chapter X - Midstream 325
  • Index 357
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