Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power

By Rowland Evans Jr.; Robert D. Novak | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The definitive account of the Nixon administration will not, of course, be written for many years, not until the Presidential papers and personal memoirs are available. For now, however, we believe that as journalists we can shed significant light on the great events of this administration, its principal figures and, most important, on the thirty-seventh President of the United States.

Our sources of information have been varied: the regular, daily reporting for our syndicated column; approximately fifty special interviews in depth with officials and former officials, high and low, of the Nixon administration whose assistance, candor and patience were absolutely indispensable to this book. For obvious reasons we shall not name them, but we shall never forget their help under often difficult circumstances.

Helen M. McMaster, our assistant, was invaluable as the principal researcher, typist and copy reader for the manuscript. We also appreciate the help of Cynthia Johnston, who performed research work, and Geraldine Williams Novak and Julie A. Cleary, who assisted with the typing.

The librarians of the Washington Bureau of Newsweek and the Washington Post were particularly cooperative. We also appreciate the assistance we received from staff members of the Washington Public Library; the library of the Washington Bureau of the New York Times; Congressional Quarterly; the Washington bureaus of Time, Newsday, the Des Moines Register and Tribune and the Los Angeles Times; the Washington Star Syndicate; television station WBTV of Charlotte, N.C.; and particularly our office neighborsthe Washington bureaus of the Boston Globe and the Newhouse Newspapers.

-vii-

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