Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power

By Rowland Evans Jr.; Robert D. Novak | Go to book overview

VIII
The Reformer

The social measures passed in 1874-80 did something to make the lot of the urban masses less unhappy, less precarious and less unhealthy. Disraeli was at the head of the Administration that brought this about, and he encouraged the policy even if he did not concern himself with its details.

-- Robert Blake, in Disraeli

Mr. Nixon is reported to be explaining himself to himself and to his inner circle as a sort of latter-day Disraeli . . . As Disraeli could do things the Liberals couldn't, so Mr. Nixon can do things Humphrey couldn't.

-- Kenneth Crawford, in Newsweek, September 1, 1969

At no time during his campaign for President in 1968 did Richard Nixon even faintly suggest the possibility of reforming the Internal Revenue Code, that tangled mass of special advantages which governed the great income-taxing system of the republic. What little Nixon did say about taxes during the 1968 campaign went in a direction opposite from that of basic tax reform, a concept that would strip away the accumulated deductions, credits and exemptions in the tax law, so that one man would pay income taxes at the same rate as the next, no matter how the money was made. To the contrary, candidate Nixon was proposing a whole new overlay of special tax allowances as incentives for socially desirable projects, such as business investment in the Negro slums.

-211-

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Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • I - The President 3
  • II - Prelude at the Pierre 9
  • III - The President's Men 37
  • IV - A Very Personal Diplomacy 75
  • V - Nixon and Congress 103
  • VI - The Politics of Civil Rights 133
  • VII - Nixonomics 177
  • VIII - The Reformer 211
  • IX - Time of Troubles 245
  • X - May 1970 269
  • XI - Agnew, Nixon and the 1970 Campaign 303
  • XII - Starting Over Again 347
  • XIII - Meeting Adversity: 1971 383
  • Source Notes 411
  • Index 413
  • About the Authors *
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