Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power

By Rowland Evans Jr.; Robert D. Novak | Go to book overview

X
May 1970

The Universities have been to this nation, as the wooden horse was to the Trojans. . . . I despair of any lasting peace among ourselves, till the Universities here shall bend and direct their studies to the setting of it, that is to the teaching of the absolute obedience to the laws. . . . The core of the rebellion, as you have seen by this, and read of other rebellions, are the Universities; which nevertheless are not to be cast away, but to be better disciplined.

-- Thomas Hobbes, in Behemoth: The History of the Causes of the Civil Wars, and of the Counsels and Artifices by which They were Carried on from the Year 1640 to the Year 1660

A society which comes to fear its children is effete. A sniveling, hand-wringing power structure deserves the violent rebellion it encourages. If my generation doesn't stop cringing, yours will inherit a lawless society where emotion and muscle displace reason.

-- Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, in his commencement address, Ohio State University, June 7, 1969

At that moment on the evening of April 30, 1970, when Richard Nixon announced to the world that American troops were crossing the border into Cambodia, he could justly say that the terrible fears of 1968 for the tranquillity of the republic had not been realized. There had been no mass rioting in black ghettos since the spring of 1968. Although the late winter and spring of 1969 had been a violent

-269-

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Nixon in the White House: The Frustration of Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • I - The President 3
  • II - Prelude at the Pierre 9
  • III - The President's Men 37
  • IV - A Very Personal Diplomacy 75
  • V - Nixon and Congress 103
  • VI - The Politics of Civil Rights 133
  • VII - Nixonomics 177
  • VIII - The Reformer 211
  • IX - Time of Troubles 245
  • X - May 1970 269
  • XI - Agnew, Nixon and the 1970 Campaign 303
  • XII - Starting Over Again 347
  • XIII - Meeting Adversity: 1971 383
  • Source Notes 411
  • Index 413
  • About the Authors *
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