Emerson at Home and Abroad

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

XXV. THOREAU.

WHEN Emerson was giving a course of lectures in my church at Cincinnati, he does consented to address the children on Sunday morning. Many times have I regretted that no reporter was present to preserve that address. It was given without notes, and its effect upon the large assembly of children could have been no less striking than that extemporaneous speech delivred by Emerson at the Burns Centenary, which so experienced a critic as Judge Hoar declares to be the grandest piece of eloquence he ever heard. Emerson, in this case as in that, held his hearers between smiles and tears. He began by telling them about his neighbour Henry Thoreau, and his marvellous knowledge of nature, his intimate friendship with flowers, and with the birds which lit on his shoulder, and with the fishes which swam into his hand. It was as if he were charming the children with a fairy-tale, or something omitted from the Gospel stories, which at the same time they felt to be true.

Not very long after ( 1862) Thoreau -- it was at the age of forty-five -- and beside his grave at Concord Emerson delivered an address in which he said, "The country knows not yet, or in the least part, how great

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Emerson at Home and Abroad
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • A Vigil. 1
  • I. Mayflowerings. 19
  • Ii. Forerunners. 28
  • Iii Three Fates. 41
  • Iv. a Boston Boy. 47
  • V. Student and Teacher. 51
  • Vi. Approbation. 58
  • Vii. Disapprobation. 67
  • Viii. a Sea-Change. 74
  • Ix. a Legend of Good Women. 81
  • X. the Wail of the Century. 90
  • Xi. Culture. 96
  • Xii. Eagle and Dove. 127
  • Xiii. Daily Bread. 132
  • Xiv. the Home. 139
  • Xv. Nature. 146
  • Xvi. Evolution. 154
  • Xvii. Sursum Corda. 162
  • Xviii. the Shot Heard Round the World. 167
  • Xix. Sangreal. 173
  • Xx. Building Tabernacles. 184
  • Xxi. a Six Years' Day-Dream. 194
  • Xxii. Lessons for the Day. 209
  • Xxiii. Concordia. 229
  • Xxiv. Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne. 256
  • Xxv. Thoreau. 279
  • Xxvi. "The Coming Man." 290
  • Xxvii. the Python. 299
  • Xviii. Emerson in England. 316
  • Xxix. the Diadem of Days. 347
  • Xxx. Lethe. 378
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