Pittsburgh: The Story of a City

By Leland D. Baldwin | Go to book overview

XXV Two Generations of Progress

DURING the two generations that have elapsed since the Civil War Pittsburgh has been reaping its share of an unparalleled era of industrial prosperity and has been aiding to bring about that prosperity by its inventions, its financial acumen, and its bold pioneering in new fields. The panics that swept the country at intervals halted only temporarily the march of progress; before long the factory chimneys were again belching forth the clouds of smoke that indicated that prosperity had turned another corner. The begrimed citizens at the forks of the Ohio looked as eagerly for smoke as the farmers looked for rain, and the mixture of smoke and fog--smog--became as characteristic of Pittsburgh as the dust storms of the and West or the hurricanes of Florida. The Pittsburgher accepted his lot with a sort of mystical pride and coined his own paraphrase of Riley's philosophy: "When God sorts out the weather and sends smog, why smog's my choice."

There have been attempts to abate the smoke nuisance by introducing more efficient means of burning the "volatile matter" in the soft coal almost universally used in the region. Factories have accomplished this most successfully, and it is the domestic furnaces that are today the greatest offenders. The name "Smoky City" sticks in the memories of visitors, however, and the na

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pittsburgh: The Story of a City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Maps xiii
  • Prologue- Lewis Evans, His Map 1
  • I- Virginia Takes a Hand in the West 13
  • II- How Are the Mighty Fallen! 27
  • III- Robbers'' Roost 38
  • IV- The Head of Iron 48
  • V- Britannia Rules the Ohio 55
  • VI- Pioneer Village in War and Peace 66
  • VII- "Intestin Broyls" 76
  • VIII- Revolt in the West 85
  • IX- Between Revolts 103
  • X- Tom the Tinker Comes to Town 117
  • XI- The Gateway to the West 129
  • XII- Genesis of an Industrial Empire 145
  • XIII- Life under the Poplars 154
  • XIV- Clapboard Democracy 172
  • XV- From Turnpike to Railroad 184
  • XVI- Civic Pittsburgh, 1810-1860 201
  • XVII- "The Birmingham of America" 218
  • XVIII- The Emergence of a Metropolis 231
  • XIX- Moral and Cultural Advancement 248
  • XX- High and Low Life 268
  • XXI- National Politics on a Local Scale 285
  • XXII- Prelude to Strife 300
  • XXIII- The Sinews of War 311
  • XXIV- The Forge of America 326
  • XXV- Two Generations of Progress 341
  • Epilogue- Trends of the Times 358
  • Errata 369
  • Errata 381
  • Maps 383
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.