Chapter Two THE MIRACLE MEN MOVE IN

IT IS CURIOUS THAT THE REPUBLICAN CAMpaign of 1932 never degenerated into an attack on Roosevelt's invalidism. Once some photographs of Roosevelt being helped out of a car were sent to Hoover, with the suggestion that circulation of them might help the Republican campaign --but they were never used. Creditable, also, was the sportsmanship of photographers, reporters and editors, who refrained from picturing or emphasizing the physical handicap.

Franklin Roosevelt had to wear very uncomfortable, intricate steel braces on both legs extending to his hips. To sit down he had to keep both feet stretched out until he could release the mechanism at the knees. To rise the braces had to be tightened to hold the support rigid. This was always painful to him physically and psychologically. On two public occasions that I know of his braces gave way under him and he fell. The press refrained from ever mentioning it and in the public mind he always stood as a powerful, commanding figure of a man.

Once in 1939 I rode up with him in the elevator in the

-22-

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