Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1425-1520: A Documented Chronology

By Blanche M. Gangwere | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 3
Supplemental Material
1. The material cited is found in Coussemaker's Scriptorum de musica medii aevi (CouS). According to Andrew Hughes (HugMM) this source is inaccurate and incomplete but an Invaluable collection of medieval treatises. The information should be checked elsewhere.
2. Brian Trowell (TroF) states that the interpretations made by Sanford Meech are faulty.
3. Ernest Trumble (TruF, 14) states that fauxbourdon originated in Italy. The fact that Dufay was thought to have been in Italy at the time he wrote his Missa Sancti Jacobi may strengthen this theory.
4. Musicologists disagree concerning the origin of white mensural notation. Thurston Dart (DarN, 203) discusses the organ piece "Felix namque" written in void notation and dated ca. 1400. He thinks that with the discovery of this piece there is reason to believe that void notation may have been an English innovation. Manfred Bukofzer (BukF, 92) states that he believes white mensural notation originated in Italy.
5. Edward Lowinsky (LowF) states that conflicting signatures in polyphonic music came about due to the gradual alteration of harmonic structure such as the change from a cadence with a 6/3 penultimate chard to a cadence of I-V-I, and the replacing of the double leading-tone cadence with the single leading-tone cadence. Richard Hoppin (HopP) states that he thinks Edward Lowinsky is mistaken in his assumption that the use of old and new types of cadences in a transitional period resulted in the need for flats in the two lower voices. The theorists examples of musica ficta are always in two parts in note against note counterpoint and their discussions are always concerned with the two voices of vertical intervals. He also. states that the signature combinations supposedly caused by the change in cadential formulas in fact ante-dated this change. Margaret Bent (BenM) discusses conflicting

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Music History during the Renaissance Period, 1425-1520: A Documented Chronology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Music Reference Collection ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps ix
  • Preface xi
  • The Period from Ca. 1425 to Ca. 1450 3
  • Supplemental Sources for the Period from Ca. 1425 to Ca. 1450 118
  • The Period from Ca. 1450 to Ca. 1490 125
  • Supplemental Sources for the Period from Ca. 1450 to Ca. 1490 211
  • The Period from Ca. 1480 to Ca. 1520 219
  • Supplemental Sources for the Period from Ca. 1480 to Ca. 1520 328
  • Appendix 1 Mannered Notation 341
  • Appendix 2 Intonation and Temperament 351
  • Appendix 3 Supplemental Material 365
  • Bibliography 373
  • Definition and Pronunciation 422
  • Index of Persons 469
  • Index of Works 475
  • Subject Index 483
  • About the Author 493
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