Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait

By Phyllis Robbins | Go to book overview

Chapter twelve

THE YEAR 1915 was a terrible one for Maude. In quick succession came the deaths of Charles Frohman, John W. Alexander, and Allen Fawcett, her stage manager, called by Mr. Saint-Gaudens"the strong support through the years."

On the news that Mr. Frohman had gone down with the Lusitania on May 7, 1915, which reached Maude when she was playing in Kansas City, Miss Boynton rushed out to. her and found time to write to me on her way, from the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Pittsburgh on May 9th:

I got your telegram yesterday just as I was leaving. I am on my way to Topeka, where Maude will be tomorrow night, unless some unforeseen change in her route occurs.

Mr. Delafield is a wonderful friend and is thinking of everything that may be necessary to protect her interests in a business way.

It is so terrible that one cannot think. I will send you some word later when I have seen Maude. Be sure I shall let you know what she needs, if anything. Your love and thought will help her much.

Mr. Lewis L. Delafield was the lawyer in charge of Maude's affairs. She was left, of course, without a manager, until Mr. Frohman's companies were organized under Charles Frohman, Inc., and Mr. Alf Hayman became manager.

Barrie wrote of Mr. Frohman in the London Daily Mail:

The man who never broke his word. There was a great deal more to him, but everyone in any land who has had dealings with Charles Frohman will sign that. . . .

-174-

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Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 21
  • Chapter Three 40
  • Chapter Four 58
  • Chapter Five 75
  • Chapter Six 89
  • Chapter Seven 110
  • Chapter Eight 124
  • Chapter Nine 140
  • Chapter Ten 155
  • Chapter Eleven 165
  • Chapter Twelve 174
  • Chapter Thirteen 186
  • Chapter Fourteen 201
  • Chapter Fifteen 213
  • Chapter Sixteen 232
  • Chapter Seventeen 247
  • Chapter Eighteen 257
  • Chapter Nineteen 263
  • Chapter Twenty 284
  • Appendix 292
  • Index 299
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