Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait

By Phyllis Robbins | Go to book overview

Chapter Thirteen

THOSE were the early days of the entry of the United States into the war, before we knew the toll the war was to take of Maude's strength. Her play for the winter, A Kiss for Cinderella, was a cheerful one to present to war-tired minds.

She was in Philadelphia in October, 1917, on the 24th, Liberty Bond Day. Deeply moved by the war, she prepared a flyer to be distributed in the theatre. On one side was the inscription on the National Memorial Arch at Valley Forge, taken from an address made at the 100th anniversary. On the reverse were two short passages:

Washington at Valley Forge, February 16, 1778 Naked and starving as they are, we cannot enough admire the incomparable patience and fidelity of the soldiery.

There was not so much as a hail from a look-out to give warning. There was a sudden impact and roar amidships. In less than five minutes the Antilles went down. The gun crews stayed at their posts. . . . And were washed away by the sea.

Newspaper report of the sinking of the transport Antilles, October 17, 1917.

Maude's real war-work began with this touring of the big cities that winter. She kept going, for she would not disband and throw the company out of work. Miss Boynton covered many small, square pages with her penciled notes, on the

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Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 21
  • Chapter Three 40
  • Chapter Four 58
  • Chapter Five 75
  • Chapter Six 89
  • Chapter Seven 110
  • Chapter Eight 124
  • Chapter Nine 140
  • Chapter Ten 155
  • Chapter Eleven 165
  • Chapter Twelve 174
  • Chapter Thirteen 186
  • Chapter Fourteen 201
  • Chapter Fifteen 213
  • Chapter Sixteen 232
  • Chapter Seventeen 247
  • Chapter Eighteen 257
  • Chapter Nineteen 263
  • Chapter Twenty 284
  • Appendix 292
  • Index 299
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