Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait

By Phyllis Robbins | Go to book overview

Chapter Sixteen

THE ODDEST trips I ever took to Europe were the brief ones with Maude in 1924 and 1925. I must go back first to the beginning of the heartbreaking story about her wish to make a motion picture of Kipling Kim -- in India -- a venturesome idea thirty years ago.

Mr. Saint-Gaudens writes:

For a diversion, Miss Adams wanted to try her hand at an extra wide screen movie in color, based on Kipling "Kim"; that is, to produce it, but not to act in it. . . . I worked with her for some time in the hope that the effort could be completed. It was to no purpose; her ideas were mechanically too far ahead of the time.

There was more to it than that, however. On her way back from London, where she had secured the rights to the story (if filmed in India) and had promised to pay a pretty penny for them, she was greeted with the news that the motionpicture industry was converting its machines into talkies; and nothing was available for her. And the financial backing that she had been promised caved in. She did not break her word, nor drop the idea, but continued to work on the script. The trips I took with her were in this connection.

We boarded the Cedric on March 15, 1924. Maude got into her berth and began to write on a scenario. Day after day she sat up in the berth and wrote, far into the night. As the height of frivolity, we occasionally played Russian Bank in the evening, in our stateroom. There was a good deal of motion; though we liked to play on a table, the cards preferred the floor. Russian Bank was the only card game she ever

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Maude Adams: An Intimate Portrait
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 21
  • Chapter Three 40
  • Chapter Four 58
  • Chapter Five 75
  • Chapter Six 89
  • Chapter Seven 110
  • Chapter Eight 124
  • Chapter Nine 140
  • Chapter Ten 155
  • Chapter Eleven 165
  • Chapter Twelve 174
  • Chapter Thirteen 186
  • Chapter Fourteen 201
  • Chapter Fifteen 213
  • Chapter Sixteen 232
  • Chapter Seventeen 247
  • Chapter Eighteen 257
  • Chapter Nineteen 263
  • Chapter Twenty 284
  • Appendix 292
  • Index 299
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