Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

By Samuel Johnson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLIX. .
THE CONCLUSION, IN WHICH. NOTHING IS CONCLUDED

IT was now the time of the inundation of the Nile: a few days after their visit to the Catacombs the river began to rise.

They were confined to their house. The whole region being under water gave them no invitation to any excursions, and, being well supplied with materials for talk, they diverted themselves with comparisons of the different forms of life which they had observed, and of various schemess of happiness, which each of them had formed.

Pekuah was never so much charmed with any place as the convent of St. Antony, where the Arab restored her to the princess, and wished only to all it with pious maidens and to be made prioress of the order: she was weary of expectation and disgust, and would gladly be fixed in some unvariable state.

The princess thought, that of all sublunary things, knowledge was the best: she desired first to learn all sciences, and then proposed to found a college of learned women, in which she would preside, that, conversing with the old, md educating the young, she might divide her time between the acquisition and communication of wisdom, and raise up for the next age, models of prudence, and patterns of piety.

The prince desired a little kingdom, in which he might

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