Radio, Television and Society

By Charles A. Siepmann | Go to book overview

Vl
THE LISTENER IN AMERICA

"The average person is surrounded today by ready made intellectual goods as he is by ready made foods, articles, and all kinds of gadgets. He has not the personal share in making either intellectual or material goods that his pioneer ancestors had. Consequently they knew better what they themselves were about, though they knew infinitely less concerning what the world at large was doing.'

- JOHN DEWEY

LEISURE is important, particularly today when for millions work is unrewarding other than in terms of dollars. It is in our leisure hours that we have opportunity to discover ourselves and to increase our stature as civilized people. Indeed, we might say that the measure of a given civilization is the amount of leisure it offers and the use to which this is put. It is the latter that is crucial.

Here in America radio is our main pastime. More than 90 per cent of American homes have at least one receiving set. Millions have several. The average man and woman spend more leisure hours in listening to the radio than in anything elseexcept sleeping. The poorer and the less educated we are, the more we listen-and naturally so. For radio-cheap, accessible, and generous in its provision for popular tastes-has come to be the poor man's library, his 'legitimate' theater, his vaudeville, his newspaper, and his club. Never before has he met so many

-82-

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Radio, Television and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Radio in the U.S.: Early History, 1920-34 3
  • III - The Fcc in Action 24
  • IV - The Radio Industry 41
  • V - Rights and Duties of the Listener 69
  • Vl - The Listener in America 82
  • Part II 168
  • IX- Freedom of Speech: in Theory 201
  • X - Freedom of Speech: in Practice 218
  • XIII - Television 317
  • Appendix VI 384
  • Appendix VII 389
  • Index 399
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