Radio, Television and Society

By Charles A. Siepmann | Go to book overview

APPENDIX VI

Excerpts from the Federal Communications Commission's decision, in re petition of Robert Harold Scott for revocation of licenses of Radio Station KQW, KPO, and KFRC. (96050).

The First Amendment to our Constitution guarantees both religious freedom * and freedom of speech. While these guarantees are expressed in terms of limitation on governmental action, they are far more than narrow legalistic concepts. They are essential parts of the fundamental philosophy underlying the form of government and the way of life which we call 'American.'

Freedom of religious belief necessarily carries with it freedom to disbelieve, and freedom of speech means freedom to express disbeliefs as well as beliefs. If freedom of speech is to have meaning, it cannot be predicated on the mere popularity or public acceptance of the ideas sought to be advanced. It must be extended as readily to ideas which we disapprove or abhor as to ideas which we approve. Moreover, freedom of speech can be as effectively denied by denying access to the public means of making expression effective-whether public streets, parks, meeting halls, or the radio-as by legal restraints or punishment of the speaker.

It is true that in this country an overwhelming majority of the people profess a belief in. the existence of a Divine Being. But the conception of the nature of the Divine Being is as varied as religious denominations and sects and even differs with the individuals belonging to the same denominations or sects.

God is variously thought of as a 'Spirit, infinite, eternal, and un

____________________
*
No principle is more firmly embedded in our Constitution than that of religious freedom. In addition to the First Amendment, Article VI repudiates any religious test as a qualification for any office or political trust under the United States. The same section, in the interests of freedom of conscience, permits affirmation rather than oath in the pledge to support the Constitution required of state and federal officials. Likewise, Section I of Article II permits the substitution of an affirmation for the oath of office required of the President of the United States.

-384-

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Radio, Television and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Radio in the U.S.: Early History, 1920-34 3
  • III - The Fcc in Action 24
  • IV - The Radio Industry 41
  • V - Rights and Duties of the Listener 69
  • Vl - The Listener in America 82
  • Part II 168
  • IX- Freedom of Speech: in Theory 201
  • X - Freedom of Speech: in Practice 218
  • XIII - Television 317
  • Appendix VI 384
  • Appendix VII 389
  • Index 399
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