Stuart and Georgian Churches; the Architecture of the Church of England outside London, 1603-1837

By Marcus Whiffen | Go to book overview

Chapter V
THE GOTHIC REVIVAL

THIS is not the place to examine the origins and the wider aspects of the Gothic Revival, or to canvass the question whether the name by which we all know that peculiarly English manifestation of the romantic spirit is as truly descriptive as it is convenient. All that has been done elsewhere. It may be taken as agreed that the movement was for many years as much a part of literary as of architectural history, that antiquaries like à Wood,

Gothic screen designed by William Kent and erected in Gloucester Cathedral 1742 Removed early in the nineteenth century (From Vardy Designs of Inigo Jones)

Hearne, and Stukeley admired medieval architecture when most people of taste did not, and that since the year 1170 hardly a decade has passed without the erection of buildings which can only be called Gothic. Everyone knows, too, that in its early stages the Gothic Revival was not mainly concerned with church building, and can recognize in the curious object noted by Dr. Richard Pococke at Wroxton in 1756, a "Gothic open rotundo of Mr. Miller's design, in which he has practis'd curtains that by turning screws let down so as to afford shelter which ever way you please", a more typical product of those days than the Gothic tower which the same Mr. Miller added to the parish church there.

-65-

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Stuart and Georgian Churches; the Architecture of the Church of England outside London, 1603-1837
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgment vii
  • Contents viii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II - Late Stuart (1660-1714) 14
  • Chapter III - Early Georgian (1714.-1760) 28
  • Chapter IV - Later Georgian (1760-1811) 46
  • Chapter V - The Gothic Revival 65
  • Chapter VI - The Regency and After 79
  • Chapter VII - Craftsmen and Artists 94
  • List of Stuart and Georgian Churches Arranged Under Counties 107
  • Index 113
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