The Dogmatic and Mystical Theology of John Donne

By Itrat Husain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III JOHN DONNE AND REVEALED THEOLOGY
REVEALED theology is that science of God and divine things which, objectively, is based on supernatural revelation, and subjectively, is treated in the light of Christian faith. Revealed theology thus deals with theoretical truths of faith concerning God and His works, and is called dogmata fidei, while moral theology is dogmata morum, and is confined to the consideration of practical truths of morality.As God is the primary object and the first principle of Christian theology, revealed theology begins with the doctrine of God's existence, essence and attributes. The dogma of the threefold personality of God is the fundamental element in the Christian doctrine of God, and therefore the Trinity, its nature, office and attributes are thoroughly discussed in revealed theology. This is followed by considering God in relation to His external activity which consists in:
1. Creation, which is His first expression of external activity; and
2. Redemption through Christ;
thus the last section also includes the Incarnation and Christology.We have divided this chapter under the following headings:
1. The Doctrine of God.
2. Creation.
3. The Holy Trinity.
4. Christology.
5. The Incarnation.
6. Christ and the Holy Ghost.
7. Christ and the Virgin Mary.
8. The Resurrection and the Ascension.
9. Angels.

Donne has not discussed in a systematic way the nature, attributes, or the Christian conception of God in one treatise, and therefore his conception of God, as creator, Saviour, and Lover has to be pieced together from the whole body of his

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dogmatic and Mystical Theology of John Donne
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 154

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.