Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie

By Carnegie Corporation of New York | Go to book overview

the advancement of any who are prepared to exert themselves.

I cannot close without a word of grateful recognition to one who shared in Andrew's life for over thirty years and who adorned his work with a beautiful halo of personal charm and grace and who by her kind sympathy and interest still inspires his trustees.


ADDRESS

JOHN H. FINLEY

LORD ELGIN has told you who are listening in from America that we are speaking from the birthplace of Andrew Carnegie. I walked early this morning all the way about the town of Dunfermline, in the very heart of which the little cottage stands, a much shorter way than around Manhattan Island. But no taller city in America may look down with disdain upon this low-storied town, for it was her son who furnished the steel for the first American skyscraper; and remembering all that he did for America and the world, Dunfermline may say of her son what Plutarch makes a certain city in Thrace say of hers: "Let other cities spurn me if they please; I was the mother of Themistocles."

(If there is any sound as of static in the transmission it may be inferred that it is from the clack of the loom in the room below.)

No permutations or other divinations of science could

-16-

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Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • From Andrew Carnegie's Birthplace 13
  • Address 16
  • Address John H. Finley 19
  • Recollections of Andrew Carnegie 25
  • Presiding Officer's Address 30
  • Andrew Carnegie the Memorial Address 34
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 52
  • Andrew Carnegie as Founder 61
  • Andrew Carnegie as Patron of Learning 78
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 93
  • In Appreciation 94
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