Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie

By Carnegie Corporation of New York | Go to book overview

Tonight we welcome and greet a friend of Mr. Carnegie, a distinguished man of science and a scholar and administrator of education who has crossed the ocean that he might make for us the address which is to mark this memorable and historic occasion. He is the head of that oldest of Scottish universities which for more than five hundred years has stood on that rock-bound coast of Fife looking out over the North Sea, holding high aloft the lamp of learning and the spirit of service and writing its name large and fine and splendid in the history of science and of scholarship, to say nothing of the history of the Scottish people.

We greet and we welcome as our distinguished friend and guest and Andrew Carnegie's friend the Principal and Vice Chancellor of the University of St. Andrews, Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, who is to speak to us in celebration of this great and moving anniversary of a friend, a captain of endeavor and a true servant of the human race.

I have the honor to present Sir James Irvine.


ANDREW CARNEGIE THE MEMORIAL ADDRESS

SIR JAMES COLQUEOUN IRVINE

THE common purpose to which I would fain believe this gathering in the City of New York is dedicated can be readily defined, and it is fitting to do so for our commemoration is more than the recital of one man's deeds. In this

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Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • From Andrew Carnegie's Birthplace 13
  • Address 16
  • Address John H. Finley 19
  • Recollections of Andrew Carnegie 25
  • Presiding Officer's Address 30
  • Andrew Carnegie the Memorial Address 34
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 52
  • Andrew Carnegie as Founder 61
  • Andrew Carnegie as Patron of Learning 78
  • In Memory of Andrew Carnegie 93
  • In Appreciation 94
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