Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie

By Carnegie Corporation of New York | Go to book overview

There come to our ears the words used by our founder when, in all humility, he expressed the hope that at the end of the life which began a century ago he would be "soothed and sustained by the still small voice within which, whispering, tells a man that, because he has lived, perhaps some small part of the great world has been bettered just a little."

His words reach us like an echo across the gulf of nearly half a century and at once we are face to face with the real man. Not the man of power and determination, not even the practical visionary or the dreamer of dreams, but the humble, grateful seeker after a better world. He was indeed rich and we know that "against such riches as these no bar will be found at the gates of Paradise."

We are the Torch-Bearers. To us has been handed the pure flame of human sympathy which illumines the steep path of man's ascent to his high destiny! May we strive to keep that flame bright.


IN MEMORY OF ANDREW CARNEGIE

NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER

AS THE years pass I find that it grows not easier, but more difficult, to speak of Mr. Carnegie. As the material incidents connected with his life and with our association fade away and become dimmer in memory, the intangible and imponderable side of his personality and his nature gains

____________________
1

Concluding the annual meeting of the Trustees of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, on November 27.

-52-

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