Andrew Carnegie Centenary, 1835-1935: The Memorial Address by Sir James Colquhoun Irvine, and Other Tributes to the Memory of Andrew Carnegie

By Carnegie Corporation of New York | Go to book overview

ANDREW CARNEGIE AS FOUNDER

FREDERICK P. KEPPEL

LAST summer I revisited some of Andrew Carnegie's favorite spots at Skibo, the places where he loved to sit looking out over water, meadow or moor, with pencil and pad in hand, to record as the spirit moved him the thoughts that surged through his active brain. His thoughts, as we know from these records, were sometimes upon his business, sometimes upon household or family or friends, but most often, perhaps, upon that stewardship of wealth which he had accepted for himself. I was never with him at Skibo, but I was fortunate enough to know him here in New York, both in action and in repose, although his was never an inactive repose. And so my memory of the man joined with the beauty of the Scotch scene to make a picture so vivid that it remains with me tonight as I speak to you.

I think we all realize that this is a very personal occasion. We have come together to honor the memory of a man, of a human, a most human, personality. And yet, those in charge have asked me to speak of certain organizations, created by Carnegie it is true but from which, once created, he was most careful to exclude his own personality. Perhaps, however, they were really right, not as to their choice of speaker, but as to their choice of a topic; for while the workings of the trusts Carnegie created were quite separate from his own personality, the conditions of their creation, the fact that they were created at all, do throw light upon that personality.

-61-

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