Men and Politics: An Autobiography

By Louis Fischer | Go to book overview

MEN AND
POLITICS

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

LOUIS FISCHER

DUELL, SLOAN AND PEARCE NEW YORK

-iii-

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Men and Politics: An Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One the Post-War Period 1921 to 1930 1
  • 1. the War is Dead, Long Live the War 3
  • 2. Proud Poles 13
  • 3. Mourning in Vienna 18
  • 4. Hitler is Born 23
  • 5. Lenin's Russia 46
  • 6. Six Lost Years 73
  • 7. Personal 117
  • 8. Life with Foreign Correspondents 153
  • Part Two World Crisis and World War 1930 to 1940 163
  • 9. the Peaceful Death of a Democracy 165
  • 10. Revolution Comes into Its Own 187
  • 11. at Home 204
  • 12. Stalin and the Gpu 216
  • 13. Palestine Revisited 240
  • 14. Mediterranean Russia 252
  • 15. Free Lance at Large 261
  • 16. the Extended Hand 299
  • 17. Appease or Oppose 312
  • 18. Before the Battle 323
  • 19. England Helps Mussolini 330
  • 20. the Statue of Liberty 333
  • 21. Holy War 351
  • 22. I Enlist 386
  • 23. the First Battle of the Second World War 402
  • 24. the Sins of Democracy 415
  • 25. Black Moscow 432
  • 26. Nyon Light 444
  • 27. Confidence and Hunger 453
  • 28. What Would Happen If . . .? 469
  • 29. Farewell to Moscow 493
  • 30. the Moscow Trials and Confessions 502
  • 31. Mr. Lloyd George 532
  • 32. Ebro: River of Blood 540
  • 33. the Fall of France 553
  • 34. Just Before Christmas: 1938 575
  • 35. the Death of a Nation 584
  • 36. a Yachtful of Diamonds and Pearls 596
  • 37. Settling, Down in America 599
  • 38. Europe Slips into War 603
  • 39. Europe at War 614
  • Conclusion 639
  • Index 659
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