Chapter VII "EVEN NATURE OPPOSES"

THE new-born republic was not long in finding trouble on its hands. Only six days after the Declaration of Independence, some seventy Canary Islanders and creole royalists, armed and mounted, gathered in Los Teques, a mountain village twenty miles west of Caracas. Carrying a flag with the picture of Fernando and shouting "Viva El Rey! Death to the traitors!" they began a march toward the capital. Within a few hours, however, they were all prisoners of the patriot troops. They were tried quickly and sentenced. Many were exiled, sixteen were shot in the Plaza Mayor. It is claimed that Miranda insisted upon the old Spanish custom of quartering the bodies by way of warning to others, but he was overruled. These were the first castigations of the republic and were used by the Spaniards later as an excuse for their horrible cruelties, which they termed "reprisals."

On the same day, July 11, a more serious uprising occurred in the city of Valencia, the second city of the colony, eighty-five miles back in the Andes. Word reached the capital on the thirteenth and the patriot army, again under the Marqués del Toro, was sent out to subdue the city. Miranda still had not the confidence of the government and, though he had the rank of lieutenant-general, was not given a command. The gouty, easy-going old Marqués was regarded by the youthful element as "wearing better the title of marquis than that of general." He certainly proved the opinion to be true. He foolishly attacked the royalists at the Pass of La Cabrera near Lake

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man of Glory: Simon Bolivar
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.